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Arikara Soup Bean

Picked up by the Lewis and Clark Expedition that brought it east to Thomas Jefferson who began growing at his Monticello home. This yellowish-tan bean cooks fast, holds its shape and becomes very creamy when cooked.

Your Price $12.50
Calypso Soup Bean

(aka Yin Yang) Hailed by many as the all-time greatest bean for baking, casseroles and soups. Can also be used as a green bean when the pods are young and tender.

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Hutterite Soup Bean

Followers of Jakob Hutler known as "Hutterites"; brought this bean with them from Russia in the 1870s; a bush type bean with ivory color. When cooked this bean has a full flavor and a deep creamy texture. Excellent for soups and casseroles, easy replacement for the pinto bean.

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Good Mother Stallard Soup Bean

A true family heirloom grown for generations. Wonderful, nutty, rich, meaty flavor. Beans plump up to almost perfectly round when cooked, one of the few dry beans that retains its colors through cooking.

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Tiger's Eye Soup Bean

One of the most beautiful of all the dry beans. Excellent creamy texture, extremely tender skin once cooked. Great for chili, refried beans or stews.

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Yellow Indian Woman Soup Bean

A rare heirloom that is now found in Native American communities. Holds its shape well in soups and slow cooked dishes; nice creamy flavor.

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Runner Cannellini Soup Bean

One of the most popular beans and has a marvelous flavor that is a hallmark of European and Italian cuisine. The flavor is earthy, creamy, and buttery, making these beans an excellent dietary substitute for potatoes.

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Green Flageolet Soup Bean

A real delicacy and usually very hard to find.  Their delicate, creamy flavor belies their hardiness.  Retains chlorophyll longer than any other bean, even after cooking, hence the name.  This colorful bean adds a host of nutrients, including powerful antioxidants, to your diet.

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Christmas Lima Soup Bean

This bean is nothing like the lima beans your mother made you eat. Originally from Peru, it's called the “Christmas” Lima because it's often used in traditional holiday stews in Italy. These beans retain their distinctive burgundy markings even after cooking. Legend has it that each year the Pope enjoys these beans at Christmas time. With their delicious, chestnut-like flavor and baked potato-like texture, Christmas Limas are big and bold in any recipe. Make a hearty soup with them, or enjoy them simply prepared with a drizzle of olive oil and a sprinkle of your favorite dry cheese. Christmas Limas are a good source of iron, and their high fiber content helps support healthy blood sugar levels. Christmas Limas also contain the trace mineral manganese, giving them powerful antioxidant properties.

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Jacob's Cattle Soup Bean

The origin of this heirloom bean is somewhat of a mystery. Some historians claim the bean came from Prince Edward Island. It is said to have been a gift from the Passamaquoddy Indians to Joseph Clark, the first white child born in Maine. Others claim German settlers brought the bean to the Americas in the 1700's. No matter how it got here, we're just glad it did, because this is a versatile bean that no garden or kitchen should be without! A plump white and red speckled bean, it's popular for holding its shape even after cooking. The flavor is described as full-flavored, similar to the flavor of new potatoes. Jacob's Cattle bean is also popular as a baked bean, and can be mashed and refried to use in Mexican dishes. At only 100 calories per ½ cup serving, it's a healthy, filling addition to any recipe.

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Eye of the Goat Soup Bean

A member of the cowpea family, this small bean is a cousin to the well-known black-eyed pea. Gray with a dark stripe, it's true to its name - the bean really does resemble the eye of a goat. These beans are so flavorful that there's no need to cook them with soup bones or ham hocks. They're great in just about everything: chili, soups, stews, cold salads, and side dishes. Toss them in a bowl, add a little fresh salsa, and enjoy. You can serve them warm or cold, and they'll be a crowd-pleaser every time. The rich color and sweet flavor of this bean hold up beautifully through the cooking process. Food and Wine magazine recently featured Eye of the Goat as one of their top seven gourmet heirloom beans.

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Snow Cap Soup Bean

These culinary gems look like luscious cranberries dipped in white chocolate, and until recently, were almost impossible to find as demand far outstripped supply. Half white, and half speckled, the Snow Cap bean is a wonderful bean to stock in your pantry for hearty soups in the winter. Many cooks like to keep them in clear containers just to show off their unique beauty. Snowcaps are described as having a silky, potato-like texture, perfect for New England chowders. The Snow Cap is rich and filling; it's one of the largest of all dried beans. When cooked, this bean grows in size over two and a half times. Put them in any kind of chili – from your grandfather's classic chili to venison chili – and your mouth will water.

Your Price $12.50